Go gentle

To my daughter, now that you are moving into the world of snapchat and Instagram. But probably not Facebook, since its only us old farts who still hang around there.

So here is some advice, in a badly re-written version of the Robbie Williams song “Go Gentle”

You’re gonna meet some perverts.
Welcome to the zoo.
Bitter disappointments.
Except for one or two.
Some of them are pretenders.
Some of them are mean.
Most of them are twisted.
Few of them are clean.

Now when you go flirting with
boys on snapchat.
Just keep it simple.
You don’t have to send nudes though.
Don’t waste time whit the idiots
Think that they’re heroes.
They will betray you.
Take care your friends

Don’t try to make them love you.
Don’t answer every troll.
Baby be a giant.
Let the world be small.
Some of them are deadly.
Some don’t let it show.
If they try and hurt you.
Just let your daddy know.

Now when you go giving your heart make
Sure they deserve it.
If they haven’t earned it.
Keep searching, it’s worth it.

 

Even security pro’s are suckers for free stuff (guess we are humans after all)

free-stuffit is interesting to see that even on security conferences you will find every thing that warn our users about. Things that we as security professionals tell our friends and co-works that no no, you must not touch.

  • Free USB thumb drives. On the last conference I attended I got a free floppy disk, but I doubt that represent any major risk, unless it contains Brain.exe
  • Free and Open WiFi. A security conference is probably the last place you want to connect to a open WiFi.
  • Free gadgets made in China that you can plug into your laptop or connect to your phone
  • The opportunity to sell your contact information to get a sticker  on a piece of paper (well why not, you might win a prize and if you are really lucky the prize is a malware infected thumb drive, or more likely the chance to get a flooded mailbox)

And no, I’m not pretending to be any better then the rest of the conference participants… I’m also a sucker for free stuff we all get. Lets plug in this Chinese Bluetooth hands free without a user manual in English, nothing bad can come of that right? Maybe its best to stick to the occasional t-shirt or baseball cap.

Canary Tokens – Free IDS for small businesses.

canaryIDS, or intrusion detection systems, can be very costly and resource demanding, because of this many medium and small companies never implements this types of solutions and as a consequence  breaches caused by external threat actors to internal employees snooping around in systems will most likely never be discovered.  And in the world of GDPR this might spell disaster for a company processing personal identifiable information, and according to GDPR that is more or less everything.

Canary tokens to the rescue.. (maybe)

Enter a free and easy to use tool called “Canary tokens” created by thinkst. Canary tokens will let you create free honeypots (or honey tokens) that will alert you by email when triggered. Now since this is a free and very basic tool it will not provide with much information on who actually triggered the token. It will give you the timestamp on when the token was accessed and source IP, but at least you know that someone is snooping around in your system, and you can take the appropriated actions to counter the breach.

The canary tokens website will let you generate multiple types of tokens, that should cover most of your needs;

  • A URL an adversary might visit
  • A domain or hostname an adversary might resolve
  • A Word or PDF document an adversary might open
  • A Bitcoin wallet from which an adversary might withdraw funds

So far I have just been playing around with the Word and PDF tokens and they have worked very well.

Of course as any other security tools and mitigations, advanced attackers can take steps that will void your canary tokens and prevent alerts from being triggered. But to be honest, if advanced hackers (e.g. state sponsored) have a foothold within your corporate network you will be very lucky if you noticed anything at all).

From the Canary Tokens blog –  Why should I care

“Network breaches happen. From mega-corps, to governments. From unsuspecting grandmas to well known security pros. This is (kinda) excusable. What isn’t excusable, is only finding out about it, months or years later.

Canary tokens are a free, quick, painless way to help defenders discover they’ve been breached (by having attackers announce themselves.)”

Simple field test

I decided to do a simple field test and posted a canary token PDF file named password.pdf on my test web server. It was not linked from any web pages, but fairly easy to find through directory indexing and traversal, so I did not put much effort into hiding it. After approx 1 hour I got an alert informing me that someone had tried to open my super duper secret file on my web server.

IMPORTANT – It will not prevent a breach. 

It is important to note that canary tokens will not protect you from being hacked, but it will provide you with a simple tripwire that, when triggered, will alert that someone is accessing your data.